Three Bass Fishing Tips

Bass Fishing pic
Bass Fishing
Image: outdoorlife.com

As the director, chairman of the board, and one-third shareholder at Custom Cables Services, Inc., Edgar Gentle has helped the Fulton, Alabama-based company reach and maintain roughly $13 million in sales annually. Outside of work, one of Edgar Gentle’s passions is bass fishing, which he does both as a hobby and a sport, competing in roughly 12 bass tournaments each year.

Because of their challenge and size, bass are some of the most sought-after fish for both hobbyist fishermen and competitors looking for that trophy fish. If you are just getting started with fishing for bass, here are three bass-specific considerations to keep in mind.

1. Time of Year – Spring and fall are typically the best times to fish for bass. During these seasons, their metabolisms are in full gear, and they can be very aggressive, which makes them more likely to attack your hook and whatever you are dangling on it.

2. Lures and Bait – Fortunately, bass are not picky when it comes to food, taking nearly anything you throw at them. That said, some combinations do work better than others. Jigs with real or plastic worms work well, as do colorful crankbaits, spinners, and mimic minnows. The key thing to remember with bass is the larger your lure, the larger your catch is likely to be.

3. Wind – While it may seem counterintuitive to fish into the wind, this is the best strategy for bass. Bass like to swim with the current, so casting into the wind helps ensure they find your bait instead of your boat, which might startle them or guide them off course from your cast.

Advertisements

Bass Fishing Myths

Bass Fishing pic
Bass Fishing
Image: fishing.about.com

Edgar Gentle serves as an attorney and partner at Gentle, Turner, Sexton, and Harbison, LLC, in Alabama, where he practices mass tort law. In his leisure time, Edgar Gentle is an avid bass fisherman.

Bass fishing is a wonderful leisure activity, but unfortunately there are certain myths and misconceptions that can keep people away from the sport. Here are two of the most common myths about bass fishing.

Big boat manufacturers will tell you that you need the largest, most expensive watercraft in order to be an efficient bass fisherman. The truth, however, is that the best anglers tend to use smaller craft. They are better equipped to handle shallow and smaller streams where the largest bass tend to congregate. Larger craft can’t get into the shallow areas, and areas with downed timber or heavy vegetation are all but unnavigable for huge bass boats.

Also, bait manufacturers have perpetuated the myth that bass strike at red hooks more frequently because they resemble the color of blood. That’s why there’s a craze surrounding every sort of bait and tackle in red. While research indicates that bass can detect the color red, there is no data at all that suggests these fish are more attracted to the color.

Bass Fishing Tips

Bass Fishing pic
Bass Fishing
Image: fishing.com

The chairman of the board of Custom Cable Services, Inc., in Fultondale, Alabama, and an attorney and partner at Gentle, Turner, Sexton, and Harbison, LLC, in Birmingham, Edgar Gentle practices mass tort law. During his leisure time, Edgar Gentle enjoys writing and bass fishing.

Among the most popular game fish in the country, largemouth bass are popular for their size and distinct appearance. Moreover, it is easier to catch bass than other species of fish. The following tips should prove useful for aspiring bass anglers:

1. Familiarity with the body of water one will be fishing in is ideal. With knowledge of underwater structures, drop-offs, and various depths, one can determine where bass are likely to seek shelter. A map makes all of this possible.

2. The best time to fish may be immediately before inclement weather, when pre-spawn bass are at their heaviest.

3. One should consider lures carefully. For example, bass enjoy wounded or teasing prey, so noise-making lures tend to attract their attention quickly. Retrieving a lure with a pop, pausing after a few moments, then letting it go steady also gives the impression of injured bait and a potentially easy meal.